Autore Topic: Family stories expose gaps in cancer care  (Letto 72 volte)

0 Utenti e 1 Visitatore stanno visualizzando questo topic.

Offline Flavio58

Family stories expose gaps in cancer care
« Risposta #1 il: Marzo 29, 2019, 12:29:25 am »
Advertisement
Family stories expose gaps in cancer care

Researchers listened to families of cancer patients describe the final days of loved ones' lives. What they learned can improve care for everyone.
        family together during cancer care

Families of cancer patients describe three distinct experiences in the final weeks of their loved ones’ lives.


Researchers gathered the perspectives, identified the problems, and say they will use what they learned to improve care at this difficult and emotionally charged time.


“All of the families in this study are telling us how we can be more helpful,” says lead author, Sally Norton, a palliative care expert and associate professor at the University of Rochester School of Nursing. “We are listening and working to do a better job.”


For the study, which appears in Supportive Care in Cancer, investigators recorded and analyzed stories from 92 families and caregivers, looking for common threads about their loved one’s final transition from active treatment to death.


Researchers call the first and largest group “We Pretty Much Knew.” The healthcare system worked for them the way it should. For example, a patient might say “I’ve had it, I’m done,” and then move into comfort care after openly discussing with loved ones and physicians about what they should expect at the end of their life.


“The third group was the smallest group, but the most tragic.”


The second group, “Beating the Odds,” included people who described themselves as “fighters” and believed the patient would beat the odds of a poor prognosis. These people said they had good communication with their medical team, which honored their wishes to continually try new treatments. But they also experienced a sense of chaos at the end of life, because they were unprepared for the nearness of death.


Families, in the third group, “Left to Die,” described a crisis in the final weeks. They had no memories of explicit end-of-life care discussions with doctors, and patients spiraled into frightening and distressing emergency health situations. These families felt abandoned.


“The third group was the smallest group, but the most tragic,” Norton says. “They felt they had no information, did not know their family member was dying, and described frantically trying to get help at the end.”


Most problems arose when families didn’t understand how the cancer was likely to progress, when deliberations with doctors and nurses were ineffective, and when medical decisions didn’t reflect a shared understanding between the family and the treatment team.


Although some families understood the limitations of available therapies, they didn’t know how to anticipate, identify, or respond to their loved ones’ rapid decline. And in some cases, caregivers felt totally unprepared and confused about what was occurring, leading to more intensive treatments and resuscitation efforts than patients had wanted and a breakdown of trust with the medical team, according to the study.


Investigators suggest that loved ones might benefit from a standard plan that lays out clearly what to anticipate as patients in active treatment become too sick for additional chemotherapy and yet don’t transition to hospice.


The health team would automatically trigger such a plan when symptoms indicated the beginning of a marked deterioration of a patient’s health. The plan would explicitly identify signs and symptoms and would develop clear action for patients and families. Ideally, it would include emergency contact information for a clinician or a response team that would quickly respond to the family and guide them, Norton says.


“The importance of clear planning and anticipatory guidance for this group cannot be overstated,” the study says.


Additional researchers are from the University of Rochester Medical Center, Rutgers University, and Weill Cornell Medicine.


Source: University of Rochester


The post Family stories expose gaps in cancer care appeared first on Futurity.


Source: Family stories expose gaps in cancer care


Consulente in Informatica dal 1984

Software automazione, progettazione elettronica, computer vision, intelligenza artificiale, IoT, sicurezza informatica, tecnologie di sicurezza militare, SIGINT. 

Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/flaviobernardotti58
Twitter : https://www.twitter.com/Flavio58

Cell:  +39 366 3416556

f.bernardotti@deeplearningitalia.eu

#deeplearning #computervision #embeddedboard #iot #ai

 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326